Lesbian Couples Retreats Near Me | Boot Camp 101

Lesbian Couples Retreats Near Me | Boot Camp 101

Couples Retreats Near Me

Lesbian Couples Retreats Near Me

A global pandemic has forced most of us to spend greater amounts of time together at home. For some in relationships, this has been a much-needed opportunity to reconnect and rediscover the importance of time spent together. For others, the impact has highlighted some pre-existing challenges with communication, patience, and understanding.

At a time where large gatherings are not ideal, it is more important than ever to find resources to support your relationship. If you came across this site while searching for “Lesbian Couples Retreats Near Me,” you have stumbled across the perfect resource for lesbian partners with access to the internet and a device with a webcam (smartphone, tablet, desktop or laptop).

For more information about upcoming retreats, visit here.

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Access to Her Inner World with Open Communication | Couples Quickies #2

Access to Her Inner World with Open Communication | Couples Quickies #2

Do you have access to her inner world?

Open Communication vs. Closed Communication 

Couple’s Quickie #2

There are two types of communication: open-door and closed-door.

Open-door communication is a direct and vulnerable sharing of your feelings, which gives the listener access to your inner world.

Closed-door communication is a self-protective way to share feelings by using protective behaviors such as criticisms, making up stories, accusations, explanations, and defensiveness.

If your partner shares a feeling with you, she is giving you a glimpse inside a world to which only she holds the key. When she unlocks this door for you, it is a gift. The views into her inner world may not always reflect back to you what you wish to see.

The gift is not about what you find inside her inner world.

The gift is that you are trusted with access to her inner world.

Imagine your workload is doubled and you have to work twice as much for a temporary period of time. Likely, both you and your wife will have feelings about this situation. If you are committed to open-door communication, you will come to each other from a vulnerable place and express your feelings in a direct and genuine way.

Open-door communication might sound like: “I miss you. Lately, I have been feeling lonely since you’ve had to work more.”

Closed-door communication might sound like this: “You work too much. I feel like you don’t care that I am alone all of the time.”

While the closed-door message is coming from the same vulnerable source of pain, the delivery is harder to hear. She is letting you know there is something going on in her inner world, but she’s keeping the door shut by using criticisms, in an effort to protect herself.

If she says she feels something, then she feels something. Unfortunately, it is a common communication mistake to hear feelings as complaints, disappointments, and criticisms. For example, the first statement, “I miss you,” might be heard as a complaint or a criticism.  You may hear it as if you are doing something wrong. That you should be home more than you are. This interpretation of “I miss you,” will likely provoke defensiveness.

When you interpret her feelings as a complaint, you are more likely to respond with a closed-door, such as: “I have no choice. I have to work.” This response misses the feeling she is expressing. This is a closed-door response to open-door communication.

If you heard “I miss you,” as a validation of your importance to her, you might respond with more softness. An open-door response may be as simple as, “I miss you, too. I can’t wait for work to slow down. Thank you for sharing that you feel the same way I do.”

It is not sufficient to add the word “feel” to your statements. When you say, “I feel THAT you…” or, “I feel LIKE you….” these are not feelings. These are opinions, stories, accusations, or potential criticisms. To truly share your feelings, you must be the subject of what you are sharing, not your wife or partner. A feeling statement will include a feeling word… I feel __________ (feeling word).

Feelings are never wrong, though they do change. They are also not accusations or criticisms. Sometimes we don’t fully understand our own feelings and all of the factors that contribute to them. The very best way to respond to your partner’s feelings is with open-door communication.

If she opens the door, appreciate and take good care of the access she is giving you to her inner world.

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Access to Her Inner World with Open Communication | Couples Quickies #2

Ten Types of Relationship Betrayals | Couples Quickies #3

Infidelity is Not the Only Betrayal in Relationships

I have never understood the mindset that there is a game-winning or game-losing shot. This, to me, renders the entire rest of the game useless, and unimportant. If the star player has made a record breaking, 62 points in the game leading up to the final 3 seconds, the team is down by 2 and her final toss toward the basket misses, is she really responsible for the game-losing shot? I think not.

Nor do I think that one betrayal can make or break a relationship. Sure, it can complicate, undermine or greatly influence a relationship, but one isolated betrayal is not typically what leads to the demise of a relationship. Furthermore, just as a bad pass might lead to a missed catch in a basketball game, one betrayal might lead to another betrayal in relationships. 

We are all responsible for our part. Always. No matter what the game. Especially in relationships. 

Betrayals come in many forms. Though many people might disagree with me, I do not believe in a hierarchy of betrayals. A betrayal is a betrayal is a betrayal. 

  • Not showing up on time
  • Not making their partner a priority
  • Not being there when their partner is hurting or sick
  • Not contributing to the well-being of the family (me rather than we)
  • Not keeping promises
  • Keeping secrets
  • Lying
  • Humiliating or putting down partner in public or private
  • Committing an act of emotional or physical infidelity
  • Being physically violent

Relationships are fluid. They are strengthened one choice at a time, and they are weakened one choice at a time. There are no make or break moments in a relationship, there is always a gradual movement toward better or toward worse. Take notice of the entire dance, not just the last few steps. T

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Lesbian Couples Quickies: Validation, Not Education

Lesbian Couples Quickies: Validation, Not Education

LESBIAN COUPLES QUICKIES:  VALIDATION, NOT EDUCATION

Couples Quickies #1

When your girl expresses a concern, need or frustration in her life (not about you), do not mistake this as her request for you to fix the situation, or fix her. If you are someone who often responds by telling her what you think, and what she should do, this quickie is especially for you.

In general, when we are hurting and we go to our spouse / partner with a painful situation, we are not asking for solutions, we are asking for support. We want to feel less alone with our pain. Often, we just want reassurance that we are okay.

lesbian couples, validation, validate, listen

Here’s a roadmap for those of you who are unsure how this might sound:

Let her talk. Don’t interrupt. Keep your questions to a minimum.

 

1. Let her know you’ve heard her.

“It sounds like … <repeat the highlights that you heard her share so she knows you were listening – don’t add your opinions or thoughts, just reflect back to her what you heard>”
 

2. Validate her feelings.

Let her know that when you look at the situation the way she’s looking at it (not the way you are), her feelings make sense (even if you disagree).

“Based on how you’ve described things, it makes sense that you feel <insert how she says she is feeling>, because <insert meaningful points she has shared that let her know that you were listening and validate why she’s feeling the way she is>…
 

3. Reassure her. 

Remind her that you are here for her. Reinforce that you are a safe person for her to talk with when she is struggling, and that even if you see things differently, your ultimate goal is to be a safe and supportive person for her to talk to.
 

“I see this situation a little differently than you do, but what matters to me the most is how I can be here for you, and make you feel supported.”

4. Inquire if she wants your perspective.

 

“Would you like to know my thoughts about this, or is it best for me to just listen?”

5. Share with her consent.

IF she says she wants your perspective, THEN, and only THEN, share your perspective.

 

“How I see this situation is … “

Focus more on understanding, less on being “right.” Remember, she has come to you to feel better, not worse.

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A Feel Good Coming Out to Parents Story

 Coming Out to Parents

 

 

 

On Christmas Eve, 1988, I was home from college for winter break.  Like every other Christmas Eve, I was gathering inspiration and ideas to begin my holiday shopping.  Yes, begin.  My mom turned to me and asked, “How are things going at school?”  Though innocent enough, this was the kind of question that only seemed subtle.  I could sense something was up, I just didn’t know what.  I replied, “Great, why?”  Quickly, the subtle was no longer so, when she said, “Your father has been worried about you.  He tells me you seem more and more distant when you two talk.” 

I felt my stomach flip, then sink.  I think I know where this is headed. Coming out to parents is a terrifying experience for most of us, and I had the sneaky suspicion that my mom was rolling out the red carpet for me to finally say to her, I’m gay.

Testing the waters, I responded with, “Well what if I am just choosing to share less, because I don’t feel like dad will approve of what I am doing, or what I have to say, even if there’s nothing wrong with it?”  Unrelenting, my mom asks, “Like what?”

Suddenly I feel as though I am driving full-speed ahead toward an innocent animal trying to cross the road.  Gripping the steering wheel, eyes closed, I pray that no one gets hurt, including me.  I swerve, asking, “What if I am dating a man who is not Caucasian?”  Knowing that she would not have an issue if this were true, but my dad might, I give her yet another out, another path to safety for both of us.  I explain, “I don’t think dad would approve, but there’s nothing wrong with it, so why would I want to share that with him?”

Is the road clear?  You know that feeling, like you’ve done your best to avoid the vulnerable animal darting across the road, with the lingering guilt of not knowing.  Persisting, my  mom says, “Are you dating someone of a different ethnicity?”  Afraid to look in my rear view mirror, I move forward, feeling as though I may just vomit.  I muster up the courage to blurt out, “What if I am not dating men at all?”  There.  I said it.  Sort of.  Please let her know what I am saying because I can’t say those three words, I can not say, I am gay.

The dance is over.  My mom has managed to position herself perfectly to ask me the question she really wanted to ask when she started this conversation.  Without the slightest change in her demeanor, she simply asks me, “Are you gay?”  And I begin to cry.  Still unchanged, her silence is kind and patient, inviting my response.  Eventually, I managed to say, “Yes, I’m gay, and I’m sorry.  I am so sorry.  I never wanted you to know. I didn’t want to be, and I am so sorry to disappoint you.” 

All this time later, still etched in my mind, is her most amazing response. I quote: “Michele, you have nothing to apologize for.  You have done nothing wrong.”  I have my mom to thank for helping me unwrap the gift of freedom that Christmas.  A gift I’ll never exchange. 

If you are contemplating coming out to parents, here are some other articles that may interest you:

Coming Out Stages

Coming Out in Heterosexual Relationships

Coming Out

Being Out

Coming Out to Parents

 

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